The Great Gatsby

By F. Scott Fitzgerald

462 Readers

Liz Mary

Wilton

Erik

samantha

Aija

Bilal

J

Allison

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Mandapanda

shellesuit

Andrés

Mandapanda

devin

Graham


Wilton Gorske read 10 pages in The Great Gatsby

10

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samantha finished reading The Great Gatsby

173

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samantha The Great Gatsby

If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him, some heightened sensitivity to the promises of life, as if he were related to one of those intricate machines that register earthquakes ten thousand miles away. This responsiveness had nothing to do with that flabby impressionability which is dignified under the name of the “creative temperament.”— it was an extraordinary gift for hope, a romantic readiness such as I have never found in any other person and which it is not likely I shall ever find again.

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samantha The Great Gatsby

“Can’t repeat the past?" he cried incredulously. "Why of course you can!"

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samantha The Great Gatsby

“Human sympathy has its limits, and we were contented to let all their tragic arguments fade with the city lights behind.”

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samantha The Great Gatsby

“In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars.”

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samantha The Great Gatsby

He was never quite still; there was always a tapping foot somewhere or the impatient opening and closing of a hand.

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samantha The Great Gatsby

[...] Then it was something more. I wasn't actually in love, but I felt a sort of tender curiosity. The bored haughty face that she turned to the world concealed something—most affectations conceal something eventually, even though they don't in the beginning—and one day I found what it was.

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samantha The Great Gatsby

“The loneliest moment in someone’s life is when they are watching their whole world fall apart, and all they can do is stare blankly.”

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samantha The Great Gatsby

“He smiled understandingly—much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life. It faced — or seemed to face — the whole eternal world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor. It understood you just as far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself, and assured you that it had precisely the impression of you that, at your best, you hoped to convey.”

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