Five Cities that Ruled the World

How Jerusalem, Athens, Rome, London, and New York Shaped Global History

By Douglas Wilson

3 Readers

Gavin

Jordan

Adam


Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

But one of the comforting things is that in the long run, stupidity doesn't work.

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Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

Freedom is messy and presents a standing affront to the tidy minded.

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Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

The new trolley lines frequently ended at baseball fields, and people who dashed in front of them were called "dodgers"—hence the Brooklyn Dodgers.

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Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

In a sense, the Industrial Revolution created certain luxuries, which included the luxury of criticizing the Industrial Revolution.

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Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

If you pull out a map of the world and look at all the countries that have the longest deepest traditions of liberty, you realize that those nations have a Calvanistic heritage. Various historians have noted this anomaly. Those who believe that God predetermines everything are the most likely to think that the king of Congress doesn't predestine anything.

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Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

Along with Augustine, Jerome, and Ambrose, Gregory is considered one of the four great doctors of the church.

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Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

Frank Calvert was convinced that he had found the ruins of Troy in western Turkey. Five years later, a more famous individual named Heinrich Schliemann provided money for more digging, and he is usually credited with the discovery.

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Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

So, the lesson went that when you hear the Bible taught, it is like the Jordan coming into your sea. But you have to apply it, put it into practice. You have to have an outlet for what you learn—otherwise you are going to become a pretty salty character and things will float in your life that ought to sink. But we can certainly press the metaphor too far.

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Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

The life span of a city's greatness is characterized by risk, courage, and sacrifice at the beginning, and by luxury and self-indulgence at the end.

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Adam Spooner Five Cities that Ruled the World

While we don't know what we don't know, this does not lead us into relativism.

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